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Community Discussion: Explaining a Communications Plan to Your Pastor

Table of Contents

Preparing a communication strategy helps your church to achieve its goal. Getting your church leaders on board, however, can be tricky.

Dorian Williams posted a question on our Facebook group that is related to this dilemma. The post says, “What’s the best way to explain to my Pastor, we need a communications plan? What is it, and what does it entitle? Why is it important?”

Here’s what our members suggested:

Comments:

“Get an understanding of where his heart is (usually the mission of the church), then show him how the mission can be accomplished through a clear and consistent communications strategy. Do some research and be ready to provide him with a roadmap of how to make it happen, or at least get connected with someone who knows how.” Henry Teage, Jr. 

“You need to use judo on this one… In other words, it needs to be your Pastor’s idea.

What are your Pastor’s goals? What is it that he wants to see happen in the life of your congregation? I would start there. I would then, over a few weeks, begin asking how you can help your Pastor achieve those goals. At some point, you can slip in “perhaps if you and I could develop a plan or schedule of some type that would help us ________. Would you like me to research templates?”. Give your pastor choices. Options will help implementation. If your Pastor goes along to keep you happy (most pastors are people pleasers and will do that), it will only frustrate you more because they won’t be all in.” Matt Steen 

“Fail to plan – plan to fail” is probably not the best way to start the convo. But stating a problem and providing a solution in a presentation is a right, constructive way. Get ready – Do a mock-up.” Shannon Mischuk

“Put it in the context of “this will help us be more effective and accomplish our vision,” not “this will make my life easier”.” Michael Lukaszewski

“If your Pastor has been resistant, do you have ideas about why? Does it seem like one more task in an overcrowded job description? Is your Pastor concerned about being like “a business” vs. a ministry? Is your Pastor worried it will cost a lot? I would do my best to present reasons for a plan that addresses what his/her concerns are… and also mention that the church already has a communications plan (announcements, sermons, bulletin, sign out front, social media, emails). A plan will help make the most of it, see who you’re missing, and help spread the Gospel more widely and effectively. And I’d go in with some solutions ready — volunteers who can help, a list of free ways to beef up your plan, etc.” Nancy Leschke 

“First thing to get traction, define the problem well. What’s the current “cost” you’re paying by not having one (confusion, noise, inefficiency, strategy determined by the squeaky wheel more than the mission, etc.). What are the implications of not developing one… what would happen if you stayed right where you are rather than working on this? How is not having one holding you back from growth? Getting clarity on these sorts of questions and agreeing that something must be done may be the first step toward progress.” Benton Cole

Conclusion:

You don’t have to pressure yourself to make the plan perfect the first time. Start with the basics and build from there. 

Hope this helps!

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