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Extending the Life of Your Outdated Logo

The shutdown meant a lot of churches had to quickly figure out how to digitally stream their services. For many churches, the only familiar thing they see each week is the pastor and worship leader. This is a great time to put your logo to work as a familiar symbol of your church. What do you do though, if your logo is outdated?

There may be good reasons you can’t design a new logo right now:

  • It’s not in the budget
  • There are higher priorities
  • You can’t get buy-in from leadership or members

If you can’t design a new logo right now, there are three ways to update your logo so it looks more contemporary, fits with your budget (starting in the $50 range) and doesn’t radically change the identity your church is familiar with:

  1. Update the font or colors. If your font or colors are looking dated, a contemporary color palette or new fonts can freshen up your look at an affordable price.

  1. Update your logo to make it look contemporary without redesigning it from scratch. Keep the theme and the same overall look but update a couple of the design details. This can give your logo new energy and extend its staying power.

  1. Create a bridge logo – a logo that includes elements of your current logo with new details you want to include in your next logo. With a bridge logo, you retain a familiar look to make it easier for church members to adapt to the logo change. This is a short term logo to help you transition to a new logo in the future.

If your logo is looking dated or obsolete, contact a trusted designer and ask for ideas or options for an update. Bring up any ideas you have for an update, and express the limitations you think you’re up against. Be sure to ask for a ballpark estimate, or tell the designer what your budget is.

Even great logos lose their relevancy over time. If your logo appears outdated it will influence the way people think of your church and ministry. Updating your logo is a way to keep your logo recognizable while making it more dynamic and current. Is your logo a good reflection of the way you want your community to think about your church, or does it need refreshing to bring vitality to your ministry?


Michael Kern is the owner of the Church Logo Gallery. He’s helped over 2000 churches connect with their communities through well-crafted logos that shares their story and attracts guests. He has designed more than 2500 church and ministry logos and his work has received 175 awards and inclusion into design books and publications. Church Logo Gallery offers church and ministry logo design and updates, as well as design and printing for all of your church-related needs.

www.churchlogogallery.com

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