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Fun Ice Breakers to Start a Conference

In our world today, where almost everything is conducted online, using various applications such as Google Meet, Zoom, and Facebook Messenger. It may not always be as lively as an in-person class or meeting. Some conferences or classes will be boring. But who wants to attend a boring conference. Hence, avoid conducting boring conferences by having ice breakers before, during, and even after the conference.

 

Here are some famous ice breakers you could use:

 

One Word Game

The One Word ice breaker allows you to provide initial context into a meeting’s topic and get everyone in the right mindset for discussion.

To play, you’ll want to divide meeting participants into smaller groups. Then, tell them to think for a minute or two, and then share with their group one word that describes X.

 

Two Truths and a Lie

One of the more classic ice breakers in the list, Two Truths, and a Lie, can be used anywhere from family parties to company events. To play, you ask each person to brainstorm three “facts” about themselves — two of the facts will be true, and one will be a lie.

 

Zoom background challenge

Share some laughs with your teammates on Zoom. Before your next all-hands or town hall meeting, set a theme and ask your colleagues to pick a virtual background image that, for them, represents it best.

Get creative. There are infinite possibilities.

 

Team trivia quiz

Ice breakers also give you an excellent opportunity to get to know your colleagues better.

Try a fun quiz with questions about your team. Collect exciting facts about each team member and then let other colleagues guess away. We’re sure you’ll dig out plenty of fun stuff!

 

Doodle away

Create some art together. Even if it’s just as pitiful as the one we produced during our recent Brand team meeting

 

Marshmallow Challenge

Tom Wujec, a business visualization expert, initially presented his Marshmallow Challenge at TED. To play, you divide your team into groups of four and give each group 20 sticks of spaghetti, one yard of tape, one yard of string, and a marshmallow. Whichever team can build the tallest structure wins — the trick is, the marshmallow must be on top.

 

Conclusion

Conduct at least two from this ice breakers list, which will surely break the stale air during your conferences. There are plenty of ice breakers available, which you can see online. Here are only some of the most famous ice breakers and are usually used during conferences. Some from this list are online, while the others may be conducted for face-to-face conferences.

 

For some more tips on how to use ice breakers to keep your small group connected check this podcast out.

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