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How to Respond When Your Ideas Are Not Heard

We’ve all felt that feeling when we aren’t heard. When ideas aren’t considered, or they are pushed aside. This can make someone feel less valuable, unimportant, and a plethora of other unpleasant feelings. 

 

When ideas aren’t heard or recognized, there’s always something that can be done. You should not give up just because the first time you share your idea it isn’t put into action. Perhaps the idea wasn’t right for that particular time. Maybe, in a few months, your idea is just what is needed.

 

There are several ways that someone can respond when their ideas aren’t heard. Giving up is one of them, but that is never the way to go. If you are confident in your idea, keep working at it. Show them your never-give-up side.

 

Ask For Feedback

If your idea isn’t heard the first time, or even the second and third, ask for advice. What can make your idea better, what should be changed, upgraded, downgraded, etc. Your plans may seem one way to you and a completely different way to another person. By asking for feedback, you are improving your idea for the next time.

 

It’s Not Personal

When your ideas aren’t heard or accepted at first, don’t take it personally. You’re not the only person who’s had a great idea and has not been heard. In fact, you’re not the only person who has had their ideas be rejected by that same person! If you end up taking it personally, you can lower your self-esteem and you may feel like giving up; and that’s the last thing we want. Instead of taking it personally, take it as a suggestion to keep working on it, and come back with it another day. 

 

Speak Up

A big reason why your ideas aren’t being heard is perhaps that you aren’t sharing them loud enough. For example, there may be several people in your church staff who have great ideas for an event happening. You have a great idea you’re proud of, yet there are others who are speaking louder than you about their own ideas. This doesn’t mean they’re shouting them, but they are speaking up in the discussions and meetings, they’re going to the right people about the ideas, and they’re taking the action steps to get their idea out there. When you’re doing these things, you’re speaking up for and about your idea, and it’ll more likely be heard and considered.

 

Be Passionate

When you’re passionate about your ideas and plans, those to who you are presenting them to will pay more attention. There is a chance they’ll feed off your enthusiasm and excitement for your ideas. If someone came up to you with an idea and they didn’t seem excited about it, would you be?

 

Have A Plan

When you have an idea, but no structure behind it, it can be hard to follow. It can go a long way when you have a plan, or something in place to structure your idea. When presenting your idea with no plan, it can be confusing and messy. When there is a plan, it becomes organized and simple to follow.

 

Conclusion

When your ideas aren’t heard, it can be a letdown. You may want to slip into the background and give up. Instead, there are ways to step back, reassess, and come back with your idea; confident and more ready than ever. Ask for and listen to the advice you get, and with a sprinkle of passion, and a plan, your ideas will be heard. 

 

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